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Occupational Outlook Handbook News Release

Technical information:   (202) 691-5700     USDL 07-1922
                http://www.bls.gov/oco/
             http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/
                    
                                            For release: 10:00 A.M. EST
Media contact:                 691-5902     Tuesday, December 18, 2007
                                        
                                        
          2008--09 EDITIONS OF THE OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK HANDBOOK AND 
           THE CAREER GUIDE TO INDUSTRIES AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET

     The 2008--09 editions of the Occupational Outlook Handbook and the Career
Guide to Industries were issued today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the
U.S. Department of Labor on the Bureauís Internet site.  The Handbook and the
Career Guide can be accessed on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco and
http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg, respectively.  Print versions of both publications
are expected to be available by Spring 2008. //ZUNI3PO Test 10302020//
     
     The Occupational Outlook Handbook has been a nationally recognized source 
of career information since the late 1940s.  The Career Guide to Industries was 
developed as a companion publication to the Handbook in the early 1990s.  These 
publications provide comprehensive, up-to-date, and reliable labor market infor-
mation that has helped millions of Americans plan their future work lives.  The 
Handbook and the Career Guide discuss prospective changes in the job market and 
the qualifications sought by employers, information that is widely used by coun-
selors, students, job seekers, education and training officials, and researchers.
     
     These publications reflect the Bureau's latest employment projections, 
which cover the 2006--16 decade.  Detailed information on the 2006--16 projec-
tions appears in five articles in the November 2007 issue of the Monthly Labor 
Review, accessible at http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/welcome.htm.  A graphic pre-
sentation of projections highlights appears in the Fall 2007 Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, accessible at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ooq.

The Occupational Outlook Handbook

     The Occupational Outlook Handbook provides detailed information about
hundreds of occupations, covering 9 out of 10 jobs in the economy.  For each
occupation, the Handbook highlights key occupational characteristics, followed
by sections about the nature of the work and work environment, requirements for
entry and opportunities for advancement, employment of salaried and self-em-
ployed workers, earnings, related occupations, and sources of additional infor-
mation.  Additionally, a section on "Job Outlook" describes each occupation's
projected employment change over the next decade, as well as the various factors
expected to affect this projection.  Examples of such factors are the aging of
baby boomers, technological innovations, changes in business practices, changes
in the goods and services demanded by businesses and consumers, and changing
foreign competition.
     
     Employment over the 2006--16 decade is expected to increase by 15.6 million,
or 10 percent.  Table 1 lists the changes in employment over the 2006--16 decade
for the 30 fastest growing occupations.  For 19 of these occupations, the most
significant source of postsecondary education or training is an associate or
higher degree.  Computer-related and health-related occupations, in addition,
account for 16 of the 30 fastest growing occupations.  Table 2 lists the changes
in employment over the 2006--16 decade for the 30 occupations with the largest
projected job growth.  Short-term on-the-job training is the most significant
source of postsecondary education or training for 14 of these occupations.

                                  - 2 -

The Career Guide to Industries

     The Occupational Outlook Handbook's companion publication, the Career Guide
to Industries, analyzes employment change from an industry perspective, providing 
information on 44 industries that cover 3 out of 4 wage and salary jobs in the 
economy.  For each industry, the Career Guide describes the nature of the indus-
try, typical working conditions, and key occupations employed in the industry.  
The Career Guide also discusses industry training practices and worker earnings.  
The "Outlook" section compares the industry's projected percentage change in wage 
and salary employment with the percentage change in wage and salary jobs for all 
industries combined.      
     
     Table 3 indicates the changes in wage and salary employment over the 2006--16 
decade for each of the industries included in the Career Guide.  Employment growth 
is projected to be concentrated in the service-providing sector.  Two industry 
groups within the service-providing sector--education and health care--are expected 
to account for half of all wage and salary employment growth in the economy.  In 
the goods-producing sector, employment is expected to grow in construction and 
decline in natural resources and manufacturing.

Enhancements to the 2008--09 Editions

     The new editions of the Occupational Outlook Handbook and Career Guide to
Industries incorporate several organizational changes.  In addition to the major
headings used in previous editions, the new editions contain subheadings, which
make it easier to find relevant information within each section.  For example,
the "Job Outlook" section of each statement now contains separate subheadings for 
employment change and job prospects.  An overview and discussion of this and the 
many other enhancements can be found in the "Occupational Information Included in 
the Handbook" and the "Information in the Career Guide to Industries" sections of 
each respective publication.

Ordering Information

     The print versions of the 2008--09 editions of the Occupational Outlook
Handbook and the Career Guide to Industries are sold by the U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, and are expected to be available by
Spring 2008.  Ordering and price information will appear online at http://
www.bls.gov/emp/emppub01.htm.
     
     Occupational Projections and Training Data will be available online 
May 2008 at http://www.bls.gov/emp/optd/home.htm.
     
     To order the Monthly Labor Review, visit http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/
subscrib.htm.
     
     Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired
individuals upon request.  Voice phone: (202)691-5200; TDD message referral
phone:  1-800-877-8339.





Table 1.  The 30 fastest growing occupations covered in the 2008-09 Occupational Outlook Handbook
(Numbers in thousands)

                                                  Employment change                                   
           Occupation                                  2006-16               Most significant source of
                                                                              postsecondary education
                                                   Number   Percent                  training (1)

Network systems and data communications ....         140      53.4             Bachelor's degree

Personal and home care aides ...............         389      50.6             Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Home health aides ..........................         384      48.7             Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Computer software engineers, applications ..         226      44.6             Bachelor's degree

Veterinary technologists and technicians ...          29      41.0             Associate degree

Personal financial advisors ................          72      41.0             Bachelor's degree

Makeup artists, theatrical and performance .           1      39.8             Postsecondary vocational
                                                                                award

Medical assistants .........................         148      35.4             Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Veterinarians ..............................          22      35.0             First professional degree

Substance abuse and behavioral disorder
 counselors ................................          29      34.3             Bachelor's degree

Skin care specialists ......................          13      34.3             Postsecondary vocational
                                                                                award

Financial analysts .........................          75      33.8             Bachelor's degree

Social and human service assistants ........         114      33.6             Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Gaming surveillance officers and gaming                                        Moderate-term on-the-
 investigators .............................           3      33.6              job training

Physical therapist assistants ..............          20      32.4             Associate degree

Pharmacy technicians .......................          91      32.0             Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Forensic science technicians ................          4      30.7             Bachelor's degree

Dental hygienists ...........................         50      30.1             Associate degree

Mental health counselors ....................         30      30.0             Master's degree

Mental health and substance abuse social
 workers ....................................         37      29.9             Master's degree


Marriage and family therapists ..............          7      29.8             Master's degree

Dental assistants ...........................         82      29.2             Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Computer systems analysts ...................        146      29.0             Bachelor's degree

Database administrators .....................         34      28.6             Bachelor's degree

Computer software engineers, systems
 software ...................................         99      28.2             Bachelor's degree

Gaming and sports book writers and runners ..          5      28.0             Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Environmental science and protection
 technicians, including health...............         10      28.0             Associate degree

Manicurists and pedicurists .................         22      27.6             Postsecondary vocational
                                                                                award

Physical therapists .........................         47      27.1             Master's degree

Physician assistants ........................         18      27.0             Master's degree

   1 An occupation is placed into 1 of 11 categories that best describes the postsecondary education or
training needed by most workers to become fully qualified in that occupation.  For more information 
about the categories, see Occupational Projections and Training Data, 2006-07 edition, Bulletin 2602
(Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2006) and Occupational Projections and Training Data, 2008-09
edition, Bulletin 2702 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, forthcoming).






Table 2.  The 30 occupations covered in the 2008-09 Occupational Outlook Handbook with the largest
employment growth
(Numbers in thousands)

                                                   Employment change                                   
           Occupation                                   2006-16             Most significant source of
                                                                              postsecondary education
                                                    Number   Percent                 training (1)

Registered nurses ..........................          587      23.5            Associate degree

Retail salespersons ........................          557      12.4            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Customer service representatives ...........          545      24.8            Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Combined food preparation and serving                                          Short-term on-the-job
 workers, including fast food ..............          452      18.1             training

Office clerks, general .....................          404      12.6            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Personal and home care aides ...............          389      50.6            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Home health aides ..........................          384      48.7            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Postsecondary teachers .....................          382      22.9            Doctoral degree

Janitors and cleaners, except maids and                                        Short-term on-the-job
 housekeeping cleaners .....................          345      14.5             training

Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants ...          264      18.2            Postsecondary vocational
                                                                                award


Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing                                          Moderate-term on-the-
 clerks ....................................          264      12.5             job training

                                                                               Short-term on-the-job
Waiters and waitresses .....................          255      10.8             training

                                                                               Short-term on-the-job
Child care workers .........................          248      17.8             training

Executive secretaries and administrative                                       Work experience in a
 assistants ................................          239      14.8             related occupation

Computer software engineers, applications ..          226      44.6            Bachelor's degree

Accountants and auditors ...................          226      17.7            Bachelor's degree

Landscaping and groundskeeping workers .....          221      18.1            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Elementary school teachers, except special
 education..................................          209      13.6            Bachelor's degree

Receptionists and information clerks .......          202      17.2            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer ...          193      10.4            Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                training


Maids and housekeeping cleaners ............          186      12.7            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Security guards ............................          175      16.9            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Carpenters .................................          150      10.3            Long-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

                                                                               Bachelor's or higher
Management analysts ........................          149      21.9             degree, plus work
                                                                                experience

Medical assistants .........................          148      35.4            Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Computer systems analysts ..................          146      29.0            Bachelor's degree

Maintenance and repair workers, general ....          140      10.1            Moderate-term on-the-
                                                                                job training

Network systems and data communications
 analysts ..................................          140      53.4            Bachelor's degree

Food preparation workers ...................          138      15.3            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

Teacher assistants .........................          137      10.4            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                                training

   1 An occupation is placed into 1 of 11 categories that best describes the postsecondary education or
training needed by most workers to become fully qualified in that occupation.  For more information
about the categories, see Occupational Projections and Training Data, 2006-07 edition, Bulletin 2602
(Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2006) and Occupational Projections and Training Data, 2008-09
edition, Bulletin 2702 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, forthcoming).






Table 3.  Wage and salary employment in industries covered in the Career Guide to Industries, 2006
and projected change, 2006-16
(Numbers in thousands)

                  Industry                                    Employment         Employment change
                                                            2006       2016       Number   Percent

All industries .......................................     138,310    153,262     14,951      10.8

Natural resources, construction, and utilities .......      10,076     10,710        634       6.3
 Agriculture, forestry, and fishing ..................       1,220      1,114       -105      -8.6
 Construction ........................................       7,689      8,470        781      10.2
 Mining ..............................................         619        609        -10      -1.6
 Utilities ...........................................         549        518        -31      -5.7

Manufacturing ........................................      14,197     12,695     -1,503     -10.6
 Aerospace product and parts manufacturing ...........         472        497         25       5.4
 Chemical manufacturing, except drugs ................         576        486        -90     -15.7
 Computer and electronic product manufacturing .......       1,316      1,159       -157     -12.0
 Food manufacturing ..................................       1,484      1,489          5        .3
 Machinery manufacturing .............................       1,192      1,045       -146     -12.3
 Motor vehicle and parts manufacturing ...............       1,070        918       -153     -14.3
 Pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing ...........         292        362         69      23.7
 Printing ............................................         636        497       -139     -21.8
 Steel manufacturing .................................         154        116        -39     -25.1
 Textile, textile product, and apparel manufacturing .         595        385       -211     -35.4

Trade  ...............................................      21,217     22,332      1,115       5.3
 Automobile dealers ..................................       1,247      1,388        141      11.3
 Clothing, accessory, and general merchandise stores .       4,352      4,676        324       7.5
 Grocery stores ......................................       2,463      2,479         16        .7
 Wholesale trade .....................................       5,898      6,326        428       7.3

Transportation and warehousing .......................       4,466      4,962        496      11.1
 Air transportation ..................................         487        522         35       7.3
 Truck transportation and warehousing ................       2,074      2,381        307      14.8

Information ..........................................       3,055      3,267        212       6.9
 Broadcasting ........................................         331        362         31       9.3
 Motion picture and video industries .................         357        396         39      10.9
 Publishing, except software .........................         660        611        -49      -7.5
 Software publishers .................................         243        321         78      32.0
 Telecommunications ..................................         973      1,022         49       5.0
 Internet services providers, web search portals,
  and data processing services .......................         383        437         54      14.0

Financial activities .................................       8,363      9,570      1,207      14.4
 Banking .............................................       1,825      1,899         74       4.0
 Insurance ...........................................       2,316      2,488        172       7.4
 Securities, commodities, and other investments ......         816      1,192        376      46.1

Professional and business services ...................      17,552     21,644      4,092      23.3
 Advertising and public relations services ...........         458        520         62      13.6
 Computer systems design and related services ........       1,278      1,768        489      38.3
 Employment services .................................       3,657      4,348        692      18.9
 Management, scientific, and technical consulting
  services ...........................................         921      1,639        718      77.9
 Scientific research and development services ........         593        649         56       9.4

Education, health, and social services ...............      29,082     34,543      5,461      18.8
 Child day care services .............................         807      1,078        272      33.7
 Educational services ................................      13,152     14,564      1,412      10.7
 Health services .....................................      13,621     16,576      2,954      21.7
 Social assistance, except child day care ............       1,502      2,326        823      54.8

Leisure and hospitality ..............................      13,143     15,016      1,873      14.2
 Arts, entertainment, and recreation .................       1,927      2,522        595      30.9
 Food services and drinking places ...................       9,383     10,407      1,024      10.9
 Hotels and other accommodations .....................       1,833      2,088        254      13.9

Government and advocacy, grantmaking, and civic
 organizations .......................................      11,210     11,895        685       6.1
 Advocacy, grantmaking, and civic organizations ......       1,234      1,392        158      12.8
 Federal Government ..................................       1,958      1,869        -90      -4.6
 State and local government, except education and
  health care ........................................       8,018      8,634        617       7.7

   NOTE:  Columns may not add to totals due to omission of industries not covered in the Career
Guide to Industries.






Last Modified Date: October 30, 2020