Electro-mechanical Technicians

Summary

electro mechanical technicians image
Electro-mechanical technicians verify dimensions of parts, by using precision measuring instruments, to ensure that specifications are met.
Quick Facts: Electro-mechanical Technicians
2020 Median Pay $qf_median_annual_wage_html $qf_median_hourly_wage_html
Typical Entry-Level Education $qf_education_html
Work Experience in a Related Occupation $qf_experience_html
On-the-job Training $qf_training_html
Number of Jobs, 2020 $qf_number_jobs_html
Job Outlook, 2020-30 $qf_outlook_html
Employment Change, 2020-30 $qf_openings_html

What Electro-mechanical Technicians Do

Electro-mechanical technicians operate, test, and maintain unmanned, automated, robotic, or electromechanical equipment.

Work Environment

Electro-mechanical technicians work closely with electrical and mechanical engineers. They work in many industrial environments, including energy, plastics, computer and communications equipment manufacturing, and aerospace.

How to Become an Electro-mechanical Technician

Electro-mechanical technicians typically need either an associate’s degree or a postsecondary certificate.

Pay

Job Outlook

Overall employment of electro-mechanical technicians is projected to grow $pc.toString().replaceAll("^\-","") percent from 2020 to 2030, $gra.

About $tools.number.format('#,###',$op) openings for electro-mechanical technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for electro-mechanical technicians.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of electro-mechanical technicians with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about electro-mechanical technicians by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Electro-mechanical Technicians Do

Electro-mechanical technicians
Electro-mechanical technicians install, repair, upgrade, and test electronic and computer-controlled mechanical systems.

Electro-mechanical technicians combine knowledge of mechanical technology with knowledge of electrical and electronic circuits. They operate, test, and maintain unmanned, automated, robotic, or electromechanical equipment.

Duties

Electro-mechanical technicians typically do the following:

  • Read blueprints, schematics, and diagrams to determine the method and sequence of assembly of a part, machine, or piece of equipment
  • Verify dimensions of parts, using precision measuring instruments, to ensure that specifications are met
  • Operate metalworking machines to make housings, fittings, and fixtures
  • Inspect parts for surface defects
  • Repair and calibrate hydraulic and pneumatic assemblies
  • Test the performance of electro-mechanical assemblies, using test instruments
  • Install electronic parts and hardware, using soldering equipment and hand tools
  • Operate, test, or maintain robotic equipment
  • Analyze and record test results, and prepare written documentation

Electro-mechanical technicians test and operate machines in factories and other worksites. They also analyze and record test results, and prepare written documentation to describe the tests they performed and what the test results were.

Electro-mechanical technicians install, maintain, and repair automated machinery and computer-controlled mechanical systems in industrial settings. This kind of work requires knowledge and training in the application of photonics, the science of light. The technological aspects of the work have to do with the generation, control, and detection of the light waves so that the automated processes can proceed as designed by the engineers.

Electro-mechanical technicians also test, operate, or maintain robotic equipment at worksites. This equipment may include unmanned submarines, aircraft, or similar types of equipment for uses that include oil drilling, deep-ocean exploration, or hazardous-waste removal. These technicians also work on energy projects involving solar power and wind.

Work Environment

Electro-mechanical technicians
Electro-mechanical technicians test the performance of electro-mechanical assemblies, using test instruments.

Electro-mechanical technicians work closely with electrical engineers and mechanical engineers. They work in many industrial environments, including energy, plastics, computer and communications equipment manufacturing, and aerospace. They often work both at production sites and in offices.

Because their job involves manual work with many machines and types of equipment, electro-mechanical technicians are sometimes exposed to hazards from equipment or toxic materials. However, incidents are rare as long as they follow proper safety procedures.

Work Schedules

Electro-mechanical technicians often work for large companies in manufacturing or for engineering firms. Like others at these firms, these technicians tend to work regular shifts. However, sometimes they must work additional hours to make repairs so that manufacturing operations can continue.

How to Become an Electro-mechanical Technician

Electro-mechanical technicians
Electro-mechanical technicians typically need either an associate’s degree or a postsecondary certificate.

Electro-mechanical technicians typically need either an associate’s degree or a postsecondary certificate.

Education

Associate’s degree programs and postsecondary certificates for electro-mechanical technicians are offered at vocational–technical schools and community colleges. Vocational–technical schools include postsecondary public institutions that serve local students and emphasize teaching the skills needed by local employers. Community colleges offer programs similar to those in technical institutes, but they may include more theory-based and liberal arts coursework.

ABET accredits associate’s and higher degree programs. Most associate’s degree programs that are accredited by ABET include at least college algebra and trigonometry, as well as basic science courses.

In community college programs, prospective electro-mechanical technicians can concentrate in fields such as the following:

  • Electro-mechanics/mechatronics
  • Industrial maintenance
  • Process control

Earning an associate’s degree in electronic or mechanical technology facilitates entry into bachelor’s degree programs in electrical engineering and mechanical engineering. For more information, see the profiles on electrical and electronics engineers and mechanical engineers.

Training in mechatronics provides an understanding of four key systems on which this occupation works: mechanical systems, electronic systems, control systems, and computer systems.

Important Qualities

Detail oriented. Electro-mechanical technicians must make and keep the precise, accurate measurements that mechanical engineers need.

Dexterity. Electro-mechanical technicians must use hand tools and soldering irons on small circuitry and electronic parts to create detailed electronic components by hand.

Interpersonal skills. Electro-mechanical technicians must take instruction and offer advice when needed. In addition, they often need to coordinate their work with that of others.

Logical-thinking skills. To carry out engineers’ designs, inspect designs for quality control, and assemble prototypes, electro-mechanical technicians must read instructions and follow a logical sequence or a specific set of rules.

Math skills. Electro-mechanical technicians use math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.

Mechanical skills. Electro-mechanical technicians apply the theory and instructions of engineers by creating or building new components for industrial machinery or equipment. They must be adept at operating machinery, including drill presses, grinders, and engine lathes.

Writing skills. Electro-mechanical technicians must write reports that cover onsite construction, the results of testing, or problems they find when carrying out designs. Their writing must be clear and well organized so that the engineers they work with can understand the reports.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Electro-mechanical technicians can gain certification as a way to demonstrate professional competence.

The International Society of Automation offers certification as a Certified Control Systems Technician. This requires, at a minimum, 5 years of experience on the job, or 3 years of work experience if the technician has completed 2 years of postsecondary education.

The National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET) offers certification in electrical power testing, industrial instrumentation, and other specialties.

Pay

Electro-mechanical Technicians

Median annual wages, May 2020

Electro-mechanical and mechatronics technologists and technicians

$59,800

Drafters, engineering technicians, and mapping technicians

$58,900

Total, all occupations

$41,950

 

Electro-mechanical technicians often work for large companies in manufacturing or for engineering firms. Like others at these firms, these technicians tend to work regular shifts. However, sometimes they must work additional hours to make repairs so that manufacturing operations can continue.

Job Outlook

Electro-mechanical Technicians

Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30

Total, all occupations

8%

Drafters, engineering technicians, and mapping technicians

2%

Electro-mechanical and mechatronics technologists and technicians

-2%

 

Overall employment of electro-mechanical technicians is projected to grow $pc.toString().replaceAll("^\-","") percent from 2020 to 2030, $gra.

About $tools.number.format('#,###',$op) openings for electro-mechanical technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

Employment of electro-mechanical technicians is projected to show little or no change from 2018 to 2028. Many of these technicians are employed in manufacturing industries that are projected to have employment declines.

Employment projections data for electro-mechanical technicians, 2020-30
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Electro-mechanical and mechatronics technologists and technicians

17-3024 13,400 13,100 -2 -200 Get data

State & Area Data

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of electro-mechanical technicians.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY
Drafters Drafters

Drafters use software to convert the designs of engineers and architects into technical drawings.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Electrical and electronic engineering technicians Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians

Electrical and electronics engineering technicians help engineers design and develop electrical and electronic equipment.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Electrical and electronics engineers Electrical and Electronics Engineers

Electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of electrical equipment.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Electrical and electronics installers and repairers Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers

Electrical and electronics installers and repairers install or repair a variety of electrical equipment.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Machinists and tool and die makers Machinists and Tool and Die Makers

Machinists and tool and die makers set up and operate machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Mechanical engineering technicians Mechanical Engineering Technicians

Mechanical engineering technicians help mechanical engineers design, develop, test, and manufacture mechanical devices.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Mechanical engineers Mechanical Engineers

Mechanical engineers design, develop, build, and test mechanical and thermal sensors and devices.

$qf_education_html $qf_median_annual_wage_html
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electro-mechanical Technicians,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electro-mechanical-technicians.htm (visited April 14, 2024).

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 4, 2019